The twin sisters are about to swap houses-Mohamad Hafeda

The twin sisters are about to swap houses-Mohamad Hafeda

Marking borders – crossing borders: negotiating public space at different levels of conflict

Mohamad Hafeda will discuss the capacity of art and design strategies to negotiate the politics of public space, at varying levels of conflict. He will present two bodies of work; the ‘Social playground’– a project series that focuses on play as a potential catalyst for instigating social public interaction – conducted through his practice Febrik in Palestinian refuge camps in Lebanon and Jordan, and in Sceaux Gardens estate in south London; and ‘Bordering Practices’ – his recent PhD art project series that explores narration and negotiation as forms of documenting and transforming political borders since their resurfacing in Beirut in 2005. The artist will reflect on the use of art processes as urban research tools in site-specific projects which in turn explore different participatory approaches and types of interventions, moving between the site where the research is taking place and the ‘off site’ gallery space.

Febrik are currently in residence on the Edgware Road working with students from Westminster Academy.

Biography
Mohamad Hafeda is an artist and a designer whose current research investigates the negotiation of spaces of political-sectarian conflict and the interplay between material and immaterial borders in contemporary Beirut. He is a founding partner with architect Reem Charif of Febrik, a collaborative platform for participatory art and design research active in Palestinian refugee camps in the Middle East and marginal contexts in London. He recently completed a PhD degree in Architectural Design at the Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London. He is the co-editor of “ Narrating Beirut from its Borderlines” (Heinrich Boll Foundation, 2011), and Febrik’s new publication “Creative Refuge” (Tadween, 2014). Febrik exhibited at South London Gallery, Victoria and Albert Museum, Mosaic Rooms, and Architecture Biennal Rotterdam.

About Febrik
Febrik is a not-for-profit collaborative platform for participatory art and design research projects with practicing architects, designers and artists active in the Middle East and the UK. Febrik is a partnership set up by Joumana al Jabri, Reem Charif and Mohamad Hafeda in collaboration with local partners and creative networks. Please see: http://febrik.org/

Mohamad Tantouri-Dream space-Febrik

Our Story – A Tale of Two Cities is a graphic novel by Barbara Pokryszka an artist and hotel worker. Set in a hotel, the story is about low pay, workplace bullying and hope through solidarity and organisation. Working closely with Barbara Pokryszka, scenes from the story are dramatised by Implicated Theatre and performed and developed by hospitality workers from the Unite Hotel Workers Branch.

Implicated Theatre have been working with members of UNITE’s Hotel Workers branch since October 2014.

Please contact Projects Curator, Amal Khalaf on amalk@serpentinegalleries.org if you would like to attend this performance workshop.

Implicated Theatre has been working since October 2011 in a series of workshops and performances forming part of their residency with the Serpentine Galleries’ Edgware Road Project. Instigated by artists from no.w.here and working with theatre director Frances Rifkin, the experimental workshops explore the relationships between political speech and action, the self and the collective, voice and silence. Forming close relationships with migrant’s rights groups and unions, Implicated Theatre creates theatrical interventions inspired by real-life struggle, and highlighting issues of social justice.Dignity poster

NAAK

Saturday 8 November, 3pm
Serpentine Gallery, Education Space

Designer and artist Bahbak Hashemi-Nezhad hosts a talk at the Serpentine Galleries Education Space. Hashemi-Nezhad has developed a number of projects focusing on the spatial politics of Church Street NW8, devising new methodologies of participation and collaborative research with local residents, school groups, sheltered housing scheme residents and interventions into public space. He has worked with the Serpentine Galleries’ Edgware Road Project since autumn 2010.

Bahbak Hashemi-Nezhad (b. 1979) is a designer based in London. His varied works cover the design of domestic and public spaces, recipes, games, interventions, product and image-production. He is interested in developing methodologies that actively engage the public within design processes and notions of defamiliarisation as a design tool. He graduated from the Royal College of Art in 2008 and regularly teaches at Central St. Martins and Kingston University in London.

Selected exhibitions and commissions include: Edgware Road Project, Serpentine Gallery; Mapusa Market, British Council, AHRC (both 2014); Open School East, Barbican (2013-14), Futurist Library, Liverpool Biennial, Survival Kit, LCCA, RIGA, Telling Not Reading, muf architecture/art (all 2013); The Grand Domestic Revolution GOES ON and Communal Knowledge, The Showroom (both 2012).

(C) HYDAR DEWACHI

(C) HYDAR DEWACHI

Join Implicated Theatre in an immersive theatre event based on experiences of migratory hope, fear, despair and anticipation. In Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night, Viola asked “What country, Friends, is this?” Travelling for refuge, change, and establishing new lives was as much a part of the world then as it is today.

This performance emerges from a series of workshops using Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed. Deciding to leave your homeland implies a moment of hope in the future, as well, perhaps, as a time of desperation, fear and retreat. Invisibility, discrimination and injustice, achievement, change and aspiration, are all elements of the experience of going to live in a new place. Implicated Theatre have worked in collaboration with the Migrants Resource Centre and Justice for Domestic Workers.

Implicated Theatre has been working since October 2011 in a series of workshops and performances forming part of their residency with the Serpentine Galleries’ Edgware Road Project. Instigated through a collaboration with artists from no.w.here and theatre director Frances Rifkin, the experimental workshops explore the relationships between political speech and action, the self and the collective, voice and silence. Forming close relationships with migrant’s rights groups and unions, Implicated Theatre creates theatrical interventions inspired by real-life struggle, and highlighting issues of social justice.

Greenside Community Centre, 24 Lilestone St, NW8 8SR

The event is free but please email: amalk@serpentinegalleries.org to book a place

Please note: the event will be filmed

Photos by Hydar Dewachi

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Mapping Church Street

Wednesday 18 June, 12 –4pm

Pitch 505, Church Street Market

Free, no booking required

  Join students and researchers from the London College of Communications as they present projects developed as part of their residency with the Edgware Road Project.  Led by artists Jackson Lam, Sophie Demay, Timothy Metcalf and Sarah Temple the projects were developed as part of a module on the BA Graphic & Media Design where students spent six weeks working closely with market stall holders, drop-in centres and residents of Church Street.

For more information contact Amal Khalaf on amalk@serpentinegalleries.org

 

 

Sunday 15 June – Old Palace Yard, Westminster, 2-5pm

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Implicated Theatre work with members of Justice 4 Domestic Workers to create a theatre intervention about the injustices that migrant domestic workers face and their struggle against recent visa legislation. Highlighting issues faced by some of the most vulnerable workers in society, the intervention is part of a rally for migrant domestic workers that will take place in front of the Houses of Parliament.

  Implicated Theatre has been working together since October 2011 in a series of intensive theatre workshops, performances and research at the Serpentine Galleries’ Centre for Possible Studies. Instigated through a collaboration with artists from no.w.here and working with theatre director Frances Rifkin, the experimental workshops explore the relationships between political speech and action, the self and the collective, voice and silence. With close relationships with the Migrants Resource Centre and other migrants rights groups and unions such as the Latin American Workers Association and Justice 4 Domestic Workers, Implicated Theatre, create theatrical interventions that address key issues that migrants in London face.

  Justice for Domestic Workers (J4DW) was established in 2009 and is supported by Unite the Union. It is an organisation of migrant domestic workers who work in private houses in the UK, and is active in campaigning to restore and improve the rights for domestic workers and for making domestic work visible in society. J4DW are the only organisation that is run for and by domestic workers and believe that in order to secure their rights they must educate and mobilise themselves and build links with those who can support us.Marissa Begonia, coordinator of Justice for Domestic Workers was involved in the ILO C189, ‘Decent Work for Domestic Workers’ negotiations at the invitation of TUC, Unite the Union and other campaigns involving J4DW.

 

For more information please contact Amal Khalaf on amalk@serpentinegalleries.org

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Market Radio is a live event taking place at Church Street Market as part of the Edgware Road Project. Join us at the Market Radio stall as we launch a radio play, an album and a DVD, all developed by local residents and artists over the past year in response to Church Street’s regeneration programme. 

Market Radio marks the outcome of three projects giving older and younger residents the opportunity to share their thoughts and reactions to the area’s regeneration, particularly the aspects of the local culture that they would like to preserve and those that they would like to develop. Bahbak Hashemi-Nezhad worked with residents of Glarus Court Sheltered Housing to compile an album; Polly Brannan developed the Mobile Variety Club with older residents and created a DVD; and Anton Kats worked on Radio Sonar with Serpentine’s Youth Forum, a group of 15-16 year olds from Westminster Academy, to write a radio play.

More about the projects:
 
The Serpentine’s Youth Forum, a group of 15-16 year olds from Westminster Academy also known as Radio Sonar, have been working with artist Anton Kats. Using listening as a tool, the project has focused on Church Street as a location for discussing issues affecting many inner city neighbourhoods, such as regeneration, unemployment, immigration and generational polarisation.
 
The outcome of the project is a radio play written and recorded by the group. Set in the future on a fictional street inspired by Church Street, the content of the play draws directly on the opinions and thoughts of local residents and businesses as gathered through interviews conducted by the group on Church Street.
 
On Friday 4th April, the group will be running a stall on Church Street Market to broadcast their radio play and invite the public to contribute to an Alphabet of Listening; an archive of opinions, thoughts and ideas about Church Street and its future.
  
The Mobile Variety Club developed by artist Polly Brannan, is a mobile social club operating in and around the Church Street neighbourhood. It hosts and creates a programme of cultural and entertainment events programmed and designed in collaboration with older residents. The programme consists of quizzes, performances, film screenings, talks, sing-alongs and creative workshops. After a year of activities in the area, an interactive DVD about the history of entertainment and the market on Church Street will be launched at Market Radio. The DVD can be used by local groups and residents for screenings at community events, meetings and festivals. 
 
Bahbak Hashemi-Nezhad will be launching a CD of music compiled by residents of Glarus Court, a Sheltered Housing block in the Church Street area. Not all the residents of Glarus Court are able to walk around the neighbourhood to meet their neighbours. However, this album will enable a form of meeting through listening: it will be played at the Market Radio stall and distributed among residents of other Sheltered Housing blocks in the area.

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The Centre for Possible Studies is once again on the road as artists CAMP present Pleasure: A Block Study at Art Dubai on the 20th March.  This publication comes out of their multi-year residency with the Serpentine Galleries’ Edgware Road Project.

Produced entirely online via the website edgwareroad.org, this volume focuses on a very small piece of the city of London: a few buildings on the Edgware Road. The book explores a history of ‘public pleasures’ that arose on the Road, starting from the 19th century to the present, alongside social shifts on the street and surrounding areas. Arab, Iranian, Kurdish and other incoming groups and businesses produced a particular history of film, music and street life that often clashed with existing legal and proprietal structures. A tumultuous few decades of these struggles form the heart of this book. 

A bilingual publication in Arabic and English, Pleasure: A Block Study is printed by Brownbook, UAE.

 

Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art and Serpentine Galleries’ Centre for Possible Studies collaborate on an exchange of artist residencies between London and Doha.

“From Neighbourhood to Neighbourhoods” is an international artist residency project co-produced by Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art and the Serpentine Galleries’ Centre for Possible Studies with support from Qatar-UK 2013 Year of Culture and the British Council.

 

The programme builds on five years of the Serpentine Galleries’ Edgware Road Project and “From Neighbourhood to Neighbourhoods”   marks Mathaf’s first residency programme, generating knowledge through developing projects related to Doha’s rapidly expanding urban environment.

 

Four artists and collectives, as well as the Centre for Possible Studies, will take place in the exchange, each crafting projects that move between the two cities and addressing issues such as urban education and development. Artists include Khalifa Al Obaidly, Alia Farid, Malak Helmy, and Ultra-red.

 

The residencies not only connect the Edgware Road neighbourhood to the various extended neighbourhoods in the Gulf to which it is historically connected, but also aim to reflect and act upon the needs of our constantly shifting cities. The artists involved investigate the possibilities for public life by generating interest in shared spaces, values, and responsibilities over the development of these neighborhoods that shape our cities.

 

The project is co-curated by Janna Graham (Project Curator, Serpentine Gallery), Amal Khalaf (Interim Projects Curator, Serpentine Gallery) and Michelle Dezember (Deputy Director for Programming and Special Projects, Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art).

  Read the rest of this entry »

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Still from The Path to Cairo (2012)

Edgware Road Project artist-in-residence Wael Shawky will have his first solo exhibition in London at the Serpentine Gallery, opening tomorrow night.  The exhibition will feature the worldwide premiere of the artist’s latest film Al Araba Al Madfuna II (2013) which re-tells Egyptian novelist Mohamed Mustagab’s parables, Horsemen Adore Perfume and The Offering.   Also featuring in the exhibition are the first two films Shawky’s Cabaret Crusades trilogy, The Horror Show File (2010) and The Path to Cairo (2012) based on Amin Maalouf’s The Crusades through Arab Eyes.

 

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